Nasturtium

One does not think of nasturtiums as a herb, but they are included in old gardening lists as such.

Some people make use of the young leaves in salad, but for some unknown reason we have abandoned the custom of adding the flowers to our salads. They taste very much like the leaves, only a little more delicate, and there is always a little drop of honey in them. Pickled in vinegar the seeds make a good substitute for capers.

To PICKLE NASTURTIUM SEEDS.

Gather your little knobs quickly after your blossoms are off; put them in cold water and salt for three days, shifting them once a day; then make a pickle (but do not boil it at all) of some white wine, exchallot, horse-radish, pepper, salt, cloves, and mace whole and nutmeg quartered; then put in your seeds and stop them close; they are to be eaten as capers.

E. Smith, The Complete Housewife, 1736.

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